April 2014

Napoleon Dynamite and Door-to-Door Sales

 
 

Napoleon

No matter if you are an experienced door-to-door salesperson or are preparing to knock doors for the first time, important door-to-door sales techniques can be learned from a transcendent scene in the movie Napoleon Dynamite.

The scene I’m referring to can be viewed here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qntlixQ9M7U

It’s easy to notice the contrasting sales styles of Deb and Rex. Deb is overtly timid in her speech, her eye contact is minimal and she gives up quickly when Napoleon offers an objection. Rex on the other hand is loud, maintains constant eye contact and comes across as supremely confident.

Effective door-to-door salespeople fall somewhere between the spectrum of these two styles. Too much confidence can come across as cockiness and too little confidence comes across as weakness. You should be confident in what you are selling and believe that your product or service is capable of helping every person you approach.

Each potential customer you attempt to sell will have objections…therefore it’s critical that you don’t give up once an objection surfaces. Expect objections but handle them as though you’ve heard them over and over again.

Finally, make sure your nonverbal communication is comfortable for the people you are trying to sell. Your eye contact, body position and hand movements should aid the sales process…not hinder it.

One final observation to note about Deb and Rex’s sales approaches is that they both offer discounts for their goods and services. Which, as I have indicated in Door-to-Door Millionaire, is one of the four points of an effective initial approach. For more on effective initial approaches, review Chapter 6, Forty-Five Seconds.

Best of luck in your ‘flippin’ door-to-door adventures!

 
 LennyGray
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