food

Have you ever eaten an entire meal only to find that once the last bite has been taken you are still hungry? Selling accounts and not getting paid because your customer didn’t follow through on their commitment is a similar feeling.

You generate interest with a carefully crafted initial approach, you thoughtfully customize an explanation of your service to perfectly fit the customer’s needs, and then painstakingly go through each detail of the service agreement only to find out that when services are to be performed your customer has changed their mind despite all of your best efforts and there is nothing you can do or say that will change their mind.

For a salesperson, this has to be the worst feeling EVER! You are helpless, hopeless and you’ve wasted time that could have been spent with more promising prospects. The thought of my customers changing their minds used to keep me up at nights during my first summer as a door-to-door salesman. Through trial and error I found 3 techniques that helped me to solidify my sales and limited my cancellations.

  1. Talk with both spouses. Unless I had no doubt that the spouse I was talking to was the ultimate decision maker, I would make a return appointment to meet with the other spouse to ensure both decision makers were on board. I was certain that I would make a far better sales pitch to the other spouse than their counterpart would.
  2. Forecast the forecast. Make a habit of knowing the weather forecast for the coming days so you can explain to your customers the challenges that the weather could create. For example, “Because my service technician will be installing equipment on the exterior of your home and there is rain in the forecast, understand that unless it is an absolute downpour, he will be able to install all of your equipment tomorrow as planned.” Or, “As I’m sure you are aware there have been some high wind warnings for tomorrow so I want you to know that if the winds are extremely gusty during the time of your appointment we will just focus on servicing the interior of your home and then make arrangements to take care of the exterior service another day.”
  3. Encourage your customer by reminding them of the great deal they are getting. While wrapping up a sale you could simply state, “I appreciate your time and know you will be pleased with our services, especially with the fantastic offer you are taking advantage of today.” By concluding your conversation the same way you started it…think Black Friday…you will tie a nice bow on the entire experience for the customer making them less likely to change their mind.

By implementing these 3 techniques during my 3rd summer as a door-to-door salesman I was able to sell 674 accounts and 668 of them were serviced. That’s less than a 1% cancel rate! These techniques assisted me in minimizing cancels and maximizing earnings. Just as it makes no sense to eat and not get full, it makes no sense to sell and not get paid. Make each sale count!

 

Did This Blog Help You? If so, I would greatly appreciate if you could comment below and share on Facebook

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Lenny Gray

Facebook: www.facebook.com/D2DMillionaire

Email: [email protected]

P.S. If you are thinking about starting a Door-to-Door Sales Program, or looking to improve your current program, be sure to check out my FREE Video Training – How to Run an Effective Door-to-Door Sales Training Camp for your Sales Team by clicking HERE.

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Word Decision and arrows over black

Whether you like it or not, your days of knocking doors this summer are quickly coming to an end. Although you may be telling yourself there is no way you’ll ever knock another door, inevitably the company you work for will encourage you to sign with them for next summer.

So how do you know if you should do it?

I suggest asking yourself these 3 questions before deciding if it’s in your best interest to resign with the same company:

  1. Did the company live up to the promises made during the recruiting process? Were you promised an apartment complex with a swimming pool, only to find out that the swimming pool was being used a skate park? Choose a company that keeps its commitments.
  2. Will the company help you to progress as a sales rep? Sometimes great sales reps work for companies with mediocre sales training. Work for a company that offers quality training to ensure you make improvements from year to year.
  3. What’s your conscience telling you? If you don’t feel good about the sales practices or character of the people at your current company, consider alternative options for next summer.

The good news is nowadays there is no shortage of companies hiring door-to-door sales reps.

You have options…plenty of them.

Find a company that fits you best. Company culture, longevity and leadership are some of the factors you should weigh before determining your best option.

For more advice on choosing a summer sales company, email me at: [email protected]

 
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Draymond3

A few weeks ago, the fate of a 70-person sales team hung in the balance as two recruiting giants in the door-to-door sales industry battled to earn the sales team’s services.

Although Company A had already signed the sales team, Company Z felt it could provide this group with a better opportunity. When the dust settled, the sales team abandoned its commitment with Company A and signed with Company Z.

What a travesty for Company A.

Days later, still reeling in disappointment, Company A contacted Company Z pleading for them to relinquish the sales team. Company A claimed the loss of the sales team would be detrimental as it had hired technicians and office staff as well as purchased vehicles and equipment to support the sales team’s production. The consequences of not having the sales team would result in lost jobs, damaged reputation, and countless hours of time and energy wasted in preparation to accommodate the sales team’s efforts.

In an unprecedented move, Company Z relinquished the group of sales reps but only if Company A agreed to sign a non-compete which prohibited them from recruiting Company Z’s signed sales reps.

Company A begged for mercy and it was granted.

So here’s where the hypocrisy comes in…

For the past several weeks Company A has relentlessly pursued my company’s sales reps and customers. In fact, a couple of weeks ago the text message shown below took place between my sales manager (in blue) and Company A’s divisional sales manager (in grey).

Aptive text

Really? Paying for your competitor’s customer list!

This low blow makes Draymond Green’s nut punch (pictured above) look like child’s play.

And, if this strategy isn’t pathetic enough, Company A’s divisional sales manager has also attempted to recruit my sales reps by offering them cash.

So let’s get this straight…Company A is doing the very thing it begged Company Z not to do, recruit sales reps that were already signed.

Company A has to realize that my company also hires technicians and office staff, as well as purchases vehicles and equipment to prepare for our summer sales teams, and with every customer lost, my technician’s routes are diminished, thus affecting their compensation and potentially their jobs.

Fortunately, Company A’s witch hunt for my sales reps and customers has resulted in little success. Cancel rates are below average and my sales reps aren’t taking the bait.

Executives at Company A will likely plead ignorance to the behavior of this divisional sales manager, but what if other managers, recruiters and sales reps at Company A use these same tactics?

Is Company A so delusional that it teaches devious tactics targeting other company’s reps and customers yet supplicates others not to do the same thing?

Figurative punches below the belt to business competitors may not result in a 1-game suspension as it did in the NBA Finals, but low blows and hypocritical tactics don’t go unnoticed and necessarily unpunished. I don’t think it’s too much to ask Company A to play by the same rules it desires to be played.

Let’s keep it clean gentlemen!

Did This Blog Help You? If so, I would greatly appreciate if you could comment below and share on Facebook

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Lenny Gray

Facebook: www.facebook.com/D2DMillionaire

Email: [email protected]

P.S. If you are thinking about starting a Door-to-Door Sales Program, or looking to improve your current program, be sure to check out my FREE Video Training – How to Run an Effective Door-to-Door Sales Training Camp for your Sales Team by clicking HERE.

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lemonade

Sales Rep: “Our service only costs $125 per visit.”

Customer: “I’m currently paying $100 per visit.”

Sales Rep: “Then I can drop your price to $95 per visit.”

In your opinion, is this interaction an example of a skilled salesman? Does dropping the price of a product or service equate to a masterful sales technique?

I would argue it doesn’t take much skill or technique to make sales by just offering a less expensive option. That being noted, price-dropping can be an effective way to gain sales, but this technique should not be lauded as a sales skill.

Last Saturday my 7-year old son attempted to sell lemonade to our neighbors for $1 a cup. He soon realized this price point was too high so he dropped the price to $.25 a cup and effectively sold out of lemonade within the hour.

My son claimed the rush of lemonade sales was the result of him being a great salesman, but of course you and I know better. It was the price drop, not his selling prowess which accelerated his lemonade sales (In another post I’ll have to share how my discussion about profit margins went with my son).

Years ago I was talking with a pest control owner from Las Vegas who told me, “I don’t care how much my competitors sell their service for because I will beat anybody’s price.”

Surely there is a segment of the population who seeks out the best deals and will sacrifice quality over cost, and this Las Vegas business owner was absolutely killing that demographic. However, he also revealed corners he was forced to cut which enabled him to keep the lowest price point in the market.

Price-dropping has its place but should not be viewed as a sales technique. It’s mostly gimmick, linked to a compromise of quality.

I suppose my son and the Las Vegas owner would make great business partners as they shared the childlike business sense that by dropping price they were better businessmen and salesmen, when in reality neither was the case.

The real winners in these scenarios were the pest control seeking homeowners in Las Vegas and my thirsty neighbors.

Skilled sales reps don’t need to price drop. In fact, the mark of a great salesman is the ability to increase price without sacrificing production.

To learn more about how your sales team can increase sales without compromising price, visit my website at: 

www.d2dmillionaire.com

 

Did This Blog Help You? If so, I would greatly appreciate if you could comment below and share on Facebook

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Lenny Gray

Facebook: www.facebook.com/D2DMillionaire

Email: [email protected]

P.S. If you are thinking about starting a Door-to-Door Sales Program, or looking to improve your current program, be sure to check out my FREE Video Training – How to Run an Effective Door-to-Door Sales Training Camp for your Sales Team by clicking HERE.

If you enjoyed this post, Price-Dropping – Sales Impotence or Genius, please retweet and comment below.

 
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April 2016
 
 

vantage

I recently received this message from Austin Sigl…a door-to-door sales rep for Vantage Marketing.

“Hey my man, I know you must get a bunch of these messages every single day but I just have to say last summer knocking doors was the hardest thing I’ve done in my young 21 years of life but it was also one of the best things. You’ve been an inspiration throughout the process I went through and what I am currently going through as I gear up for this upcoming summer. So thank you bottom line Lenny and I wish you the absolute best in life.”

Thanks Austin and best of luck knocking doors this summer!

Did This Blog Help You? If so, I would greatly appreciate if you could comment below and share on Facebook

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Lenny Gray

Facebook: www.facebook.com/D2DMillionaire

Email: [email protected]

P.S. If you are thinking about starting a Door-to-Door Sales Program, or looking to improve your current program, be sure to check out my FREE Video Training – How to Run an Effective Door-to-Door Sales Training Camp for your Sales Team by clicking HERE.

If you enjoyed this post, Sales Rep Feedback, please retweet and comment below.

 
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